Water Fast, Weight Loss Slow

Turning on the Water gatha (poem)

Water flows from high in the mountains
Water runs deep in the earth
Miraculously water comes to us,
and sustains all life.  ~Thich Nhat Hanh

mysterious gift

mysterious gift ~d nelson

By reciting this water gatha before turning on the tap helps me be mindful of the simple act of taking water. Mindfulness is always mindfulness or awareness of something, making it more real. How often I have taken water for granted. Letting it run unnecessarily. The nearby lake, less than 20% filled, is a clear sign of these time of drought. A bell of mindfulness of each drop’s sacred, life-sustaining nature. I vow to help protect and conserve fresh water so that there is an adequate amount to sustain life.

This past week I went on a water fast. Actually it was mostly water. An intention to increase mindfulness and gratitude for water. To more deeply experience it running through my heart, pumped to every living cell in this body. Into a half-gallon of filtered water I added the juice of one lemon per day. It became the most fragrant, refreshing lemonade-water ever. I also added a couple teaspoons of psyllium fiber each day to show some love to the GI tract; that it not feel forgotten. As a dietician, I designed an immediate, but gentle personal-fasting encounter as a meditation on water. At first there was slight hunger and the mind coercing a trip to the frig. After a couple of days hunger pangs intensified from being a slight, dull feeling to deep belly aches. I breathed in, aware of the discomfort, accepting it as it is. Then breathed out, letting go of negative thoughts about the discomfort. It was easy to recognize the truth that I’m still alive and there is so much beauty before me. Perhaps sounds coming from my insides, such as growling, rumbling and burps were embarrassing, at times. Actually, I smiled and acted like there were no noise, but those sitting near me during meditations and yoga might have felt a fright as sounds became distressing. I apologized sincerely, in my heart, to those affected.

After a few days the sounds gradually went away. I recognized varying degrees of weakness and light-headedness. Each sip of water became a blessing. Lips moistened, throat soothed, stomach thankful and quickly filled, as it had noticeably shrunk. Holding the glass I knew I was drinking water. Such joy at simply drinking water. Each day I continued with my usual exercise routine of yoga, walking or cycling. Drinking lots of water did mean more frequent pit stops along the way. It was wonderful to feel energized during and after activities. Isn’t it amazing to have a body that can endure and even thrive under adversity? By week’s end I migrated to juicing. Getting the nutrient-rich waters from vegetables, mostly carrots, beets and celery. Spicing it up with onion, ginger, and jalapeño peppers. Feeling super vitalized,  Today I’m back eating my regular vegetarian diet, more than a kg lighter. But now with increased appreciation for water, the object of my meditation and physical practice over this past week.

Remember, dear one, when we walked long distances to get water? So far to the river, to the stream. Remember going to the well, fetching a jug of water and carrying it back to prepare a meal? Each cell in our body has the DNA of ancestors. The memory of struggle to obtain the essential elixir of our existence. It was ancestors’ dream that someday their descendants would be able to have access to pure, clean water without struggle. Perhaps by simply turning a lever. Could they imagine both cold and hot water at our fingertips? Isn’t it such a miracle how water comes to us and sustains our life? After this week’s fast my appreciation of water has surely grown. A short water fast, even for a day, can be helpful to gain a deeper spiritual connection to water.

Continuing to pray and meditate with gratitude for rain to ease the drought, as you are, that adequate water manifests soon and continues its presence for our descendants’ needs.

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22 thoughts on “Water Fast, Weight Loss Slow

  1. Karen Wan

    Your water fast is a beautiful way to direct attention to the importance of water in our lives. I’m not ready to do one now, but I will remember this idea for later this year. It’s cold and snowy where I live, and I feel that my body needs more than water at this point, but in the warmer times come, I will remember your idea and try this out. My usual routine is to drink water with lemon in the morning, so I will try to add more appreciation of that water as I think of my friends in the west where water is scarce for the time being. Thank you once again for inspiring me.

    Karen

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      i appreciate your supportive comment, Karen. since this winter has been so mild here, a little self deprivation was less difficult than if i had harsh weather. may we continue expanding our awareness and gratitude for life’s most basic gifts 🙂

      Reply
  2. viewpacific

    Happily, it’s raining near Deer Park Monastery and snowing in the Sierras.
    Thanks for the reminders of how cultivate appreciation from both having and not having.

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      makes me happy knowing that you are in touch with Deer Park and the Sierras. it rained fully up north of the bay area all yesterday. wishing social lots of wetness. i appreciate your kind words 🙂

      Reply
  3. Annelisa Sings

    Thank you for sharing your appreciation/water fast. Water is currently plentiful where I live; however, every time I turn on the tap I think of you and my other friends out West who live with such scarcity. We must protect and appreciate what we have and be mindful of the way waste affects others. Namaste

    Reply
  4. Tom McCubbin

    Insightful focus on how it is that we take easy availability of water for granted. A lot of rain the past couple of days in California, helping to relieve some of the pain of drought.

    Reply
  5. Mary Ann Barton

    These are powerful words and actions, smilecalm. Here in Massachusetts we are chafing at the long, snowy winter. And now I have reason to notice my gratitude for water in all its forms. Amen.

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      Thanks Mary Ann for your kind understanding. It has been wet here for a few days offering some green and hope. Perhaps Mass. will produce a little extra produce this summer with the extra moisture.

      Reply
  6. ~meredith

    This is so inspirational. Our water was stored in a well that a water truck came to fill once a month (for house use), and livestock and land use depended on abundant snow melts. It wasn’t about poverty, it was about balanced living in arid, high altitudes… and practicing stewardship. The earth was delicate in its balance, and I had to learn that balance… and thanks be to country family for modifying my in-town, Barbie doll life.

    Thank you so much for sharing your practice. I feel so inspired, so grateful to you. Namaste.

    xx. Meredith

    Reply
  7. delightfullyslow

    (From Switzerland) Grüezi Smilecalm! Being grateful for water brings us back to the basics! Many around the world will have to do with limited amounts of water as drought will be severe this year in many countries! Thanks for sharing this insight! I really like this article! Tschüss!

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      Thank you for your kind words, my friend. My heart beats in solidarity to those who struggle to have adequate essentials of water, food and shelter. May you be well 🙂 Tschüss

      Reply

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