Blind Teen Touches Cracked Bell’s Freedom

she feels blind justice ~d nelson

she feels blind justice ~d nelson

How could your classmate find Liberty Bell’s freedom,Β  blindness notwithstanding, teacher asks.
Students raise their hands after a brief, reflective pause.
“She sees with her heart”, exclaims one student.

“She understands the Founding Father’s intentions”, says another.
“That all men, women, children, animals, plants & minerals
are created equal & have natural rights to exist.”

 

“Justice is to do what is right, so all should
be cared for, fed & have a safe, warm home”, says a shy one in back.

“Many have offered example, putting their lives on the line
in pursuit of justice for all”, states a boy.

“She does not see colors & form, as we do,
which frees her from making a discrimination
between herself & other things.
Not comparing herself to others
frees her from feeling she is better,
worse or the same as others”, replies another.
Teacher nods & smiles to the class’ insights.

blind justice- bell & hall

blind justice- bell & hall

Because you believe in a self, you compare that self with other selves. Out of it come the superiority complex, the inferiority complex, the equality complex. If you touch the truth of non-self in you, you are free. ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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64 thoughts on “Blind Teen Touches Cracked Bell’s Freedom

  1. Walking My Path: Mindful Wanderings in Nature

    Deeply touching, David. Your words and photos are beautifully crafted and chosen. And I love the Thich Nhat Hanh quote.
    Peace and Freedom
    Mary

    Reply
  2. Tippy Gnu

    It seems there’s a freedom that can be declared by law, and another freedom that cannot be extinguished by law. I’ll go for that other freedom.

    Reply
  3. Sonnische

    Beautiful post, David! I love the photo of the blind student, her fingers gently placed to take in the sensory impressions of the old bell. The words of the students explaining how they understand her unique perceptions are beautiful too. I’m so grateful for being able to read this today!

    Reply
  4. Carol A. Hand

    Such deep and crucial truths from children, David. Thank you for the reminder that we must see with our hearts if we are to fully understand what really matters. ❀

    Reply
  5. Jet Eliot

    I am currently reading “John Adams” by David McCullough, an excellent historical account of his efforts, and his compatriots’, in setting out the structure for the new country of America. Wow, he was one selfless man, deeply devoted to equality and freedom, justice. I enjoyed your photos, words, lesson and quotes, David, thank you.

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      thank you for your sharing about John Adams, Jet! Yes, many had a beautiful aspiration for descendants in the future, along with a cracked bell πŸ™‚

      Reply
  6. JoAnna

    I love how you’ve combined the students thoughts with these particular photos. It’s nice to read about positive experiences in education. I know positive things happen all the time, but we need to spread this stuff around more. Sharing of FB and twitter if you don’t mind.

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      yes & yes Hariod!
      Imho, true freedom from ill being towards well being includes responsibility to ensure others are not imprisoned by our
      freedom πŸ™‚

      Reply
  7. Aquileana

    Excellent post… the sound of the bell reminds us of the importance of Distributive Justice and Equity, which are always good reminders, even more nowadays.. Thanks so much for sharing… wishing you a great weekend, Aquileana πŸ˜ƒ

    Reply
  8. Jean-Jacques @ Gypsy CafΓ©

    Amazing insights from the children. I especially like: “She sees with her heart”… I would call this “heartuition” – on the part of the blind girl and the child who made the observation. If only we could all start seeing with our hearts…

    Reply
  9. MK

    Thank you for your inspiring post, David. I love your words and photographs which make a whole essay on justice.
    I was reflecting on the passing of Muhammad Ali, and how great was his courage, intelligence and spirituality. I think about how our armed forces members & veterans are so often acknowledged with “thank you for your service”. And I think of Muhammad Ali’s tremendous service by resisting the war against Vietnam, and the illness of racism. I think to him belongs a sincere “thank you for your service”.

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      Thank you for your kind, supportive words, Michael. This world is in need of real justice, imho. As a veteran I can find Ali’s contribution
      to the well being of others
      of a much greater magnitude than any GI I’ve encountered πŸ™‚

      Reply
  10. Annika Perry

    I love this post, David. Wise words not only from Thich Nhat Hahn but also from the students themselves. That fills me with hope for the future and lifts my heart with joy. Great photos as well. Reading this sent me on an information hunt about liberty bell as I realised I knew so little about it – fascinating history.

    Reply
    1. smilecalm Post author

      smiling to your kind, supportive words, Annika! may a bell of mindfulness offer you a pause to experience relaxation & freedom πŸ™‚

      Reply
  11. Michael

    I am touched by beauty this day, reading these words and seeing these pictures. Simple foods like beauty and wonder are the most nourishing…

    Peace
    Michael

    Reply
  12. Alison and Don

    β€œShe does not see colors & form, as we do,
    which frees her from making a discrimination
    between herself & other things.
    Not comparing herself to others
    frees her from feeling she is better,
    worse or the same as others”

    This kind of insight from a teenager gives me hope for the future!
    Alison

    Reply
  13. harulawordsthatserve

    Beautiful – that opening image is so moving! The smiles on both their faces. Thanks for this dose of hope, this reminder of how wise and naturally kind young people are… Warm blessings, Harula x

    Reply
    1. Ka Malana@Fiestaestrellas.com

      Thinking back on it, she’s a young woman, but still… What does she see in her mind? Does she see age and time altogether differently? Is time not an expression of being worn? Your post has so much more going on, Justice, Freedom, Teaching, Students, a Chief. Well, not simple at all. Wonderfully rich with waking eyes.

      Reply
      1. smilecalm Post author

        i appreciate hearing these questions, Ka!
        Smiling to your curious, caring heart!
        I, too, have more questions
        than answers πŸ™‚

  14. Marisa

    This is just lovely, and especially pertinent today, when we in the U.S are thinking of the Florida shootings. Thank you for a moment of peace, and thanks for stopping by eve’s apple. ~Marisa (mcproco.wordress.com)

    Reply
  15. Pingback: Blind Teen Touches Cracked Bell’s Freedom | SmileCalm

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